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  • Public Awareness on Goat Meat Handling Practices and Its Public Health Implication in Dire Dawa Town, Eastern Ethiopia
    Vol. 6 No. 1 (2017)

    INTRODUCTION
    Food safety remains a critical issue with outbreaks of foodborne illness resulting in substantial costs to individuals, the food industry and the economy (Kaferstein et al.,
    1997). Despite advances in food science and technology, foodborne diseases remain one of the major public health and economic problems all over the world (WHO, 1995; Legnani et al., 2004). The risk of foodborne illness has increased markedly over the last 20 years, with nearly a quarter of the population at higher risk for illness (CDC, 2003; CDC, 2004). Foodborne diseases occur commonly in the developing countries due to the predominant poor food handling and sanitation practices, inadequate food safety laws, weak regulatory systems, lack of financial resources to invest in safer equipment, and lack of education for food-handlers (Subratty & Gurib, 2003). There is a strong relationship between meat consumption and foodborne disease outbreaks (Holt & Henson, 2000).

  • A STUDY ON PREVALANCE OF OVINE LUNGWORM INFECTION IN AND AROUND KOMBOLCHA, ETHIOPIA
    Vol. 6 No. 1 (2017)

    A cross-sectional study was carried out in and around Kombolcha district of north eastern Ethiopia, from November, 2015 to April, 2016 to determine the prevalence
    and the predominant species of lungworms infection in sheep and to relate lungworm infection with different risk factors in the study area. 

  • A STUDY ON PREVALANCE OF OVINE LUNGWORM INFECTION IN AND AROUND KOMBOLCHA, ETHIOPIA
    Vol. 6 No. 1 (2017)

    A cross-sectional study was carried out in and around Kombolcha district of north eastern Ethiopia, from November, 2015 to April, 2016 to determine the prevalence
    and the predominant species of lungworms infection in sheep and to relate lungworm infection with different risk factors in the study area. Fecal samples
    were randomly collected from 407 sheep in and around Kombolcha town and laboratory examination was done using Modified Baerman technique. The overall
    prevalence of lungworm infection in the study area for this current study was 40% (163/407). The lungworm parasite species identified by the fecal sample
    examination were Muelleries capillaries, Dictyocaulus filaria and Protostrogylus rufescens, with prevalence rate of 44.8% (73/163), 30.1% (49/163), 9.8% (16/163)
    respectively and also mixed infection 15.3% (25/163) was present. Among those, Mullerus capillaries were more prevalent in study area than Dyctyocaulus fillaria
    and Protostrongylus rufescens. The sex of animals in study area did not show significant association with the prevalence of lungworm infection (P= 0.68). The
    prevalence rate of lungworm parasite was higher in adult 46.72% (107/229) and lower in young animals 31.46% (56/178). This indicates there is a significant
    association between the prevalence of lungworm infection and age of sheep (P = 0.002). The body condition of animals was also found to be significantly
    associated to the prevalence of lungworm infection (P=0.00) and highest in animals which have poor body conditions 72.22% (65/90) than medium and good
    scores. Management system was another factor found to be significantly associated (P= 0.001) with high prevalence rate under extensive management
    system 46.72% (114/244) than semi-intensive Management system 30.06% (49/163) with lungworm parasite infection. The present study shows that lungworm infection was one problem of sheep in the study area. Thus, control and prevention of lungworm infection in the study area need due attention.